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Immodest clothing doesn't belong at school

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The headline for the Internet version of the article regarding my letter to the editor was, ‘Dress code letter sparks outrage.’ I’m here to tell you that I am the one outraged. The outgoing vice principal was quoted as saying; “…there have not been any complaints about the dress code at the school until now.” I was face to face with her in her office 10 years ago, “complaining” about the skimpy attire worn by female students. Her reply then was it was the warm weather. I told former superintendent Roger Yohe, that I’d be embarrassed to have students under my jurisdiction wearing what some of the high-school girls wear. I was incredulous when I read that the vice principal said, “…. the dress code was set up years ago by the students themselves.” The students setting up the dress code sounds like a scene from Alice in Wonderland. There are so many things wrong with allowing girls in attendance in high school to wear immodest clothing that I do not have room to list them in this letter. It is counterproductive in so many ways. Unless the adults, from the school board on down to the classroom teachers, agree, then this absurdity will continue. This is an opportune time to get organized for the upcoming school year. A new vice principal who I believe is an excellent choice will be starting in the fall. I suggest that the dress code from Arlington School District in Arlington, Texas be adopted and enforced. Unlike Lincoln’s current dress code, Arlington’s is much more definitive, making it easier to enforce. For example it sets the minimum lengths of skirts and shorts and flatly states that the display of cleavage is unacceptable. It can be downloaded from this URL: http://www.aisd.net/pdf/DressCode.pdf. Our three kids, who are now successful adults, graduated from Lincoln High School. I have nothing but good things to say about the current students I’ve met in passing. In spite of all my criticism, I wouldn’t hesitate to send our kids to Lincoln High School again. Don Stewart, Lincoln