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Dress code at Lincoln High is not appropriate

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“LHS dress code exposed” was the (top story on the) front page of the May 28 News Messenger. It’s not the dress code that is exposed, it is the open cleavage of the young lady in the article. Now if she were more endowed, would that have been OK too? Two fingers as a measure for the shoulder straps? The straps aren’t the problem! I guarantee the men and boys looking at her blouse are not looking at her shoulder straps. Does anyone reading this believe that the width of the straps is the issue? The real problem is the low-cut shirts and blouses too many girls and women are wearing today, in the name of fashion. What happened to modesty? Of course, a lot of teenagers everywhere don’t think it’s a big deal. What has happened to morality? Each generation takes it down just a little bit farther. Don Stewart was absolutely right about his observation and his right to have an opinion. My husband and I thought the same thing when we saw the picture. As I continued to read the article, I found the first problem: the dress code was set up by the students years ago (does the inmates running the asylum come to mind?) The second problem: the parents who allow their children to wear provocative clothes, low-cut blouses with cleavage and breasts for all to see, too-tight pants, too-short shorts, etc. And boys and men wearing pants falling down their legs with underwear showing or no underwear with butt cleavage showing. I graduated from Lincoln High School in 1964. In the early spring of 1961, when I was a sophomore, it snowed. We girls had to get special permission to wear pants to school. But only for three days. Our dress code (not written by students) was dresses or skirts and blouses with only a few buttons open, with no plunging necklines. Sure that was a long time ago styles have changed but not always for the better. Another reason for the dress styles and attitude of our young people is TV. Too many parents use this as the babysitter but don’t monitor what is watched. Kids see all kinds of situations like rebelliousness, adultery, murder, disrespecting elders, sleeping with anyone they want, cussing, etc. Remember the “I love Lucy” show? They were married but couldn’t sleep in the same bed. When Lucy was going to have a baby, they weren’t allowed to say the word pregnant on TV. What happened to censorship? The lust of the eyes opens up so many problems. People want to sin and forget the consequences, but for every action, there is always a reaction. Nancy Moose, Lincoln