comments

Ask the DMV: Can’t drive anymore? Turn in your license for ID card

By: George Valverde, California Department of Motor Vehicles
-A +A

Q: I’m a senior citizen and recently lost the ability to drive due to medical complications.

Where can I find information on acquiring an identification card? Is there a fee for my new card?

A: For customers over the age of 62, the California Department of Motor Vehicles offers an identification card valid for 10 years for no charge.

The card looks likes a driver license, but is used for identification purposes only. The DMV will also exchange a valid license for a no-fee ID card to drivers who are no longer able to drive safely because of a physical or mental condition. Visit dmv.ca.gov/dl/dl_info.htm#idcard on the DMV Web site for more information.

Q: I bought a vehicle with a clean air sticker. Is the sticker still active even though I wasn’t the original owner?

A: Yes, all clean air stickers remain with the vehicle they were originally issued to and cannot be transferred to any other vehicle.

If you purchase a vehicle that has a clean air sticker you may transfer the sticker to your name. To transfer the clean air sticker to your name, complete the following steps:

• Complete an Application for Clean Air Vehicle Stickers (REG 1000).

• Check the “Replacement ID card only” box.

Submit the completed REG 1000 form to the address on the REG 1000 form. For more information on clean air stickers, visit dmv.ca.gov/vr/decal.htm.

Q: I’ve heard that the DMV is “going green.” What is that all about?

A: Great question. Energy and environmental conservation is something that the department is deeply committed to.

In just the past two years, the DMV has opened several energy-efficient offices that include many features designed to conserve energy and resources, in accordance with the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) program.

In addition, the department’s “working green” initiative encourages employees to make a positive impact on the environment at both home and work, promoting the use of green materials and resources.

Q: Can you give me some more information on your senior ombudsman program?

A: Sure. In a continuing effort to keep seniors driving for as long as they can do so safely, the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) has created a Senior Ombudsman Program.

There are five ombudsmen throughout California that are assigned to the program. Their primary function is to represent the interest of public safety for all Californians with a special interest in addressing the concerns of senior drivers.
They can assist as a go-between to ensure that senior drivers are treated fairly, consistent with laws and regulations, and with the dignity and respect they deserve.

The ombudsmen are available to assist in individual cases, as well as participate in outreach seminars to promote driver safety in California with an emphasis on senior issues.

DMV Senior Ombudsmen are available to assist you at the following local location:

• Sacramento/Northern California (916) 657-6464.

George Valverde is the director of the California Department of Motor Vehicles. Do you have questions about general driving related requirements like registration or insurance? Are you unclear about laws and restrictions related to driving? The California DMV has answers at dmv.ca.gov. And now, you can submit any DMV-related questions at askdmv@dmv.ca.gov.