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Out of the Museum

Are checks outdated today?

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LINCOLN AREA ARCHIVES MUSEUM

Where: Beermann Plaza at 640 5th St.

When: Open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

Free: Donations always accepted

 

We’re giving you a break this week with no questions about the mystery couple pictured here this week. Next week, though, we’ll tell you about this generous couple.

Regarding last week’s mystery item, no one had the right answer about what the item was called.

With online banking becoming popular today, it’s not really surprising that no one identified the item as a protectograph or a machine used to print checks in sequential order. 

Bill Jorge of Lincoln brought in the early 1900s patented check-writer shown in last week’s News Messenger.  

G. W. Todd and Company of Rochester, New York manufactured the machine, which can be seen at the Lincoln Area Archives Museum next to a vintage typewriter. Remember typewriters back in the day?

The protectograph machine was used to print the face value on negotiable securities in relief so the printing could be seen and felt in an attempt to prevent changes being made to checks.

The Todd company manufactured a smaller version in 1898 that punched holes, showing the check amount, to prevent anyone from changing the check amount.

These machines from the prior century indicate that check scams have been around for many decades.

 ­- Carol Feineman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1LNM Out of the Museum    How this couple is helping the Lincoln Area Archives Museum will be explained in next week’s Out of the Museum. Carol Feineman/Lincoln News Messenger

 

 

 

LINCOLN AREA ARCHIVES MUSEUM

Where: Beermann Plaza at 640 5th St.

When: Open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

Free: Donations always accepted

 

 

Out of the Museum

Are checks outdated today?

We’re giving you a break this week with no questions about the mystery couple pictured here this week. Next week, though, we’ll tell you about this generous couple.

Regarding last week’s mystery item, no one had the right answer about what the item was called.

With online banking becoming popular today, it’s not really surprising that no one identified the item as a protectograph or a machine used to print checks in sequential order. 

Bill Jorge of Lincoln brought in the early 1900s patented check-writer shown in last week’s News Messenger.  

G. W. Todd and Company of Rochester, New York manufactured the machine, which can be seen at the Lincoln Area Archives Museum next to a vintage typewriter. Remember typewriters back in the day?

The protectograph machine was used to print the face value on negotiable securities in relief so the printing could be seen and felt in an attempt to prevent changes being made to checks.

The Todd company manufactured a smaller version in 1898 that punched holes, showing the check amount, to prevent anyone from changing the check amount.

These machines from the prior century indicate that check scams have been around for many decades.

 ­- Carol Feineman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

1LNM Out of the Museum    How this couple is helping the Lincoln Area Archives Museum will be explained in next week’s Out of the Museum. Carol Feineman/Lincoln News Messenger

 

 

 

LINCOLN AREA ARCHIVES MUSEUM

Where: Beermann Plaza at 640 5th St.

When: Open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

Free: Donations always accepted

 

 

Out of the Museum

Are checks outdated today?

We’re giving you a break this week with no questions about the mystery couple pictured here this week. Next week, though, we’ll tell you about this generous couple.

Regarding last week’s mystery item, no one had the right answer about what the item was called.

With online banking becoming popular today, it’s not really surprising that no one identified the item as a protectograph or a machine used to print checks in sequential order. 

Bill Jorge of Lincoln brought in the early 1900s patented check-writer shown in last week’s News Messenger.  

G. W. Todd and Company of Rochester, New York manufactured the machine, which can be seen at the Lincoln Area Archives Museum next to a vintage typewriter. Remember typewriters back in the day?

The protectograph machine was used to print the face value on negotiable securities in relief so the printing could be seen and felt in an attempt to prevent changes being made to checks.

The Todd company manufactured a smaller version in 1898 that punched holes, showing the check amount, to prevent anyone from changing the check amount.

These machines from the prior century indicate that check scams have been around for many decades.

 ­- Carol Feineman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

1LNM Out of the Museum    How this couple is helping the Lincoln Area Archives Museum will be explained in next week’s Out of the Museum. Carol Feineman/Lincoln News Messenger

 

 

 

LINCOLN AREA ARCHIVES MUSEUM

Where: Beermann Plaza at 640 5th St.

When: Open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

Free: Donations always accepted

 

 

Out of the Museum

Are checks outdated today?

We’re giving you a break this week with no questions about the mystery couple pictured here this week. Next week, though, we’ll tell you about this generous couple.

Regarding last week’s mystery item, no one had the right answer about what the item was called.

With online banking becoming popular today, it’s not really surprising that no one identified the item as a protectograph or a machine used to print checks in sequential order. 

Bill Jorge of Lincoln brought in the early 1900s patented check-writer shown in last week’s News Messenger.  

G. W. Todd and Company of Rochester, New York manufactured the machine, which can be seen at the Lincoln Area Archives Museum next to a vintage typewriter. Remember typewriters back in the day?

The protectograph machine was used to print the face value on negotiable securities in relief so the printing could be seen and felt in an attempt to prevent changes being made to checks.

The Todd company manufactured a smaller version in 1898 that punched holes, showing the check amount, to prevent anyone from changing the check amount.

These machines from the prior century indicate that check scams have been around for many decades.

 ­- Carol Feineman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

1LNM Out of the Museum    How this couple is helping the Lincoln Area Archives Museum will be explained in next week’s Out of the Museum. Carol Feineman/Lincoln News Messenger

 

 

 

LINCOLN AREA ARCHIVES MUSEUM

Where: Beermann Plaza at 640 5th St.

When: Open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

Free: Donations always accepted

 

 

Out of the Museum

Are checks outdated today?

We’re giving you a break this week with no questions about the mystery couple pictured here this week. Next week, though, we’ll tell you about this generous couple.

Regarding last week’s mystery item, no one had the right answer about what the item was called.

With online banking becoming popular today, it’s not really surprising that no one identified the item as a protectograph or a machine used to print checks in sequential order. 

Bill Jorge of Lincoln brought in the early 1900s patented check-writer shown in last week’s News Messenger.  

G. W. Todd and Company of Rochester, New York manufactured the machine, which can be seen at the Lincoln Area Archives Museum next to a vintage typewriter. Remember typewriters back in the day?

The protectograph machine was used to print the face value on negotiable securities in relief so the printing could be seen and felt in an attempt to prevent changes being made to checks.

The Todd company manufactured a smaller version in 1898 that punched holes, showing the check amount, to prevent anyone from changing the check amount.

These machines from the prior century indicate that check scams have been around for many decades.

 ­- Carol Feineman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

1LNM Out of the Museum    How this couple is helping the Lincoln Area Archives Museum will be explained in next week’s Out of the Museum. Carol Feineman/Lincoln News Messenger

 

 

 

LINCOLN AREA ARCHIVES MUSEUM

Where: Beermann Plaza at 640 5th St.

When: Open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

Free: Donations always accepted

 

 

Out of the Museum

Are checks outdated today?

We’re giving you a break this week with no questions about the mystery couple pictured here this week. Next week, though, we’ll tell you about this generous couple.

Regarding last week’s mystery item, no one had the right answer about what the item was called.

With online banking becoming popular today, it’s not really surprising that no one identified the item as a protectograph or a machine used to print checks in sequential order. 

Bill Jorge of Lincoln brought in the early 1900s patented check-writer shown in last week’s News Messenger.  

G. W. Todd and Company of Rochester, New York manufactured the machine, which can be seen at the Lincoln Area Archives Museum next to a vintage typewriter. Remember typewriters back in the day?

The protectograph machine was used to print the face value on negotiable securities in relief so the printing could be seen and felt in an attempt to prevent changes being made to checks.

The Todd company manufactured a smaller version in 1898 that punched holes, showing the check amount, to prevent anyone from changing the check amount.

These machines from the prior century indicate that check scams have been around for many decades.

 ­- Carol Feineman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1LNM Out of the Museum    How this couple is helping the Lincoln Area Archives Museum will be explained in next week’s Out of the Museum. Carol Feineman/Lincoln News Messenger

 

 

 

LINCOLN AREA ARCHIVES MUSEUM

Where: Beermann Plaza at 640 5th St.

When: Open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

Free: Donations always accepted

 

 

Out of the Museum

Are checks outdated today?

We’re giving you a break this week with no questions about the mystery couple pictured here this week. Next week, though, we’ll tell you about this generous couple.

Regarding last week’s mystery item, no one had the right answer about what the item was called.

With online banking becoming popular today, it’s not really surprising that no one identified the item as a protectograph or a machine used to print checks in sequential order. 

Bill Jorge of Lincoln brought in the early 1900s patented check-writer shown in last week’s News Messenger.  

G. W. Todd and Company of Rochester, New York manufactured the machine, which can be seen at the Lincoln Area Archives Museum next to a vintage typewriter. Remember typewriters back in the day?

The protectograph machine was used to print the face value on negotiable securities in relief so the printing could be seen and felt in an attempt to prevent changes being made to checks.

The Todd company manufactured a smaller version in 1898 that punched holes, showing the check amount, to prevent anyone from changing the check amount.

These machines from the prior century indicate that check scams have been around for many decades.

 ­- Carol Feineman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

1LNM Out of the Museum    How this couple is helping the Lincoln Area Archives Museum will be explained in next week’s Out of the Museum. Carol Feineman/Lincoln News Messenger

 

 

 

LINCOLN AREA ARCHIVES MUSEUM

Where: Beermann Plaza at 640 5th St.

When: Open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

Free: Donations always accepted

 

 

Out of the Museum

Are checks outdated today?

We’re giving you a break this week with no questions about the mystery couple pictured here this week. Next week, though, we’ll tell you about this generous couple.

Regarding last week’s mystery item, no one had the right answer about what the item was called.

With online banking becoming popular today, it’s not really surprising that no one identified the item as a protectograph or a machine used to print checks in sequential order. 

Bill Jorge of Lincoln brought in the early 1900s patented check-writer shown in last week’s News Messenger.  

G. W. Todd and Company of Rochester, New York manufactured the machine, which can be seen at the Lincoln Area Archives Museum next to a vintage typewriter. Remember typewriters back in the day?

The protectograph machine was used to print the face value on negotiable securities in relief so the printing could be seen and felt in an attempt to prevent changes being made to checks.

The Todd company manufactured a smaller version in 1898 that punched holes, showing the check amount, to prevent anyone from changing the check amount.

These machines from the prior century indicate that check scams have been around for many decades.

 ­- Carol Feineman